Appleton Ridge
Barn and Evening Mist
Circular Stone
Clary Hill
Cow Path
Cows in Meadow
Field Stone
Haymounds at Dusk
Morning Fog
Path Along Flatbrook
Reflecting Trees
Savage Pond
Setting Sun
Study for Pentahedon Collection
Supporting Rock
Untitled
Untitled (Rock Series)
Watery Passage
Winter Patterns
Y- fall
Yellow-Green Afterglow




About the Artist

Joseph A. Fiore (1925-2008), a Black Mountain College alumnus and teacher, and critically acclaimed vanguard New York artist in the 1960's, spent his summers in Jefferson, Maine in later life.

From this period stem his representational landscapes, which are important transitional pieces from an art collector's perspective, and testimonial to the depth of connection Fiore felt with the natural world.

During his lifetime, Fiore generously supported the work of Maine Farmland Trust. Today, through Fiore's art, the Fiore family continues to support Maine Farmland Trust in its mission to preserve Maine's farmland forever. Close to forty art works have been donated to Maine Farmland Trust with this very mission in mind.

When purchasing Joseph Fiore's art, 100% of the proceeds goes directly to farmland preservation in Maine.

Fiore's plein air paintings led the way to the later, well-known abstract work. About the landscape works, artist and critic, Fairfield Porter, wrote in "The Nation", November 5, 1960, "Fiore's more or less abstract landscapes seem to express the oriental view that man's value inheres in an equality to the other small parts of an immense whole…Fiore does not usually paint separate things – isn't a valley, a storm, weather, light, a relationship?"

Fiore began as an abstract painter, moving through several transitions in his life as an artist. He studied at Black Mountain College in North Carolina with Joseph Albers and Willem deKooning, and later taught there from 1949-1956. He also taught at the Philadelphia College of Art, the Maryland Institute of Design, the Parsons School of Design, and the Artists for Environment Foundation.

Moving in and out of landscape painting, mostly as a result of spending summers in Maine since the 1950's, the artist felt that his abstractions derived from the "primal impulses" to be felt in the deepest working of nature and time. The landscapes led him to reflect upon the geometry of the universe; he firmly believed that both artist and scientist alike play a part in this geometry, which through careful study becomes a part of who they are. For him, the crossing back and forth from representation to abstraction nourished the two modes. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, music also played a major role in his life and work. His father, Salvatore Fiore, was a founding 40 year member of the Cleveland Orchestra. Fiore's imagery and color certainly have a musical arrangement quality to them. The artist passed away in 2008 at the age of 83.